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[TUTORIAL] Capturing from the turntable (VINYL RIP)

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[TUTORIAL] Capturing from the turntable (VINYL RIP)

Postby fgp303 on Tue Mar 22, 2005 2:59 am

First I will show some gear which important for a good final result.

First we need to find a good headsheel I prefer the Orsonic AV-101b. This is the best HIFI headsheel - perfectly fit for DJ projects and outstanding sound quality.

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Its a special anti-vibration headshell - u can easily test this function if u play in a club where the technics 1210 create big feedback problems. Simply put this headsheel in to play and it will save the party :D - Only big problem you may have with this fantastic headsheel - the Orsonic factory is closed some years ago... So u can only find it used or choose the remake version from ClearAudio - usually goes for around 300-400 Euro. Personally, I use the original Orsonic AV-101b headshell system that i bought for $250(USD) around 2 years ago.

Now look around in the pickup business :D Personally, I have a lot of pickup/stylus systems but I will only suggest the 2 best solutions for moving magnet systems. Its not good to choose the moving coil system for digitized modern dance music (It’s systems usually have better sound but they have much bigger noisefloor + they need special things like a pre-transformer for the low level MC system and generally this system needs more precise measurements for correct setup). So from Moving Magnet system (MM) I prefer the Ortofon OM Broadcast E (if u need acceptable price vs. performance)

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My personal favorite Orsonic Super OM40 system (this one is little tricky b/c Ortofon only made systems to super OM30 range - the only way is if u buy one super OM system and buy a standalone OM40 needle - its interchangeable with all Ortofon Super OM systems) The OM broadcast E system costs around 80-100euro. While the OM’s are more expensive they are much better than just the OM40 needles. 275euro is a super OM pickup price.

After we find the right components for the end of the tone arm we need some cables that will interconnect the pickup and the shell - this is called the headshell lead. If you have need of a good headshell lead i suggest the Cardas HSL PCC Headshell Leads made by Cardas Audio.

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If u think this is expensive u can choose a lower price Cardas PCCE

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…..or Sumiko Headshell Leads - another brand of acceptable products. If you need some bolts for fixing the pickup to headshell i suggest the JA Michell Cartridge Headshell Bolts - only 15euro and u will get 2* 10 mm & 16 mm stainless steel long black Allen bolts, nuts, washers, and Allen key to mount phono cartridges rigidly. A good record clamp can help to smooth out the records. I use Thorens Stabilizer which is a good device at 160euro.

[img]http://www.thorens.ch/THORENS/images/img9_1.jpg[/img]

Now you need to buy some measurement devices - best if u buy some - use them anytime you need them. First, find a good spirit leveler i use Clearaudio Spirit level - its a good solution for around 40-50euro.

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+ maybe a stylus pressure gauge like Shure SFG-2 (SFG-2 is accurate to 1/10 gramm).

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If need more accuracy it will be expensive but the Shure is enough for MM systems. Now we need to find a Baerwald two-point alignment gauge. Its not too expensive - around 5-10euro. I prefer the Garrott Brother's Alignment Protractor - which looks like this paper:

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Hmmm…..need one test record like this: Hi-Fi News Test Record. This is the successor to the original Hi-Fi News Test LP. The original tracks have been re-cut with a frequency sweep track added and the Pink Noise tracks extended. The new 17-track version is an even finer pressing than the original. This British audio publication presses this straightforward LP of analog setup tests and signals with the average audiophile in mind. Tests include channel balance, phasing, bias setting, pink noise, tracking ability, cartridge/arm lateral resonance test and cartridge alignment. Includes a cartridge alignment tool. The package includes detailed notes, a set-up 'Bible' courtesy of John Crabbe, locked grooves between tests, pristine virgin vinyl pressings and - best of all - audible and visible cues rather than a need for test gear. Side one contains nine tracks for L/R channel identification, phase, channel balance (-20dB pink noise L+R), the same again for the left channel only and the right channel only and four different tracks for setting bias, increasing in 2dB steps. All these tests require are your ears - the instructions will guide you through every step. Side Two features seven tracks which cover tracking ability, cartridge/arm resonance and cartridge alignment. Tracking ability is assessed through three sections, all using a 300Hz signal (L+R, +15dB). The three tracks are positioned as the first, middle and last tracks so you can gauge performance across the whole arc of travel. (Or line of travel, if you're the lucky owner of a tangential arm...) The two cartridge/arm resonance tests consist of test sweeps with pilot tones, and you'll actually see the arm misbehaving if there's any horrible mismatch in your set-up. The cartridge alignment test allows you to adjust the azimuth for minimum output, through a 300Hz vertical L-R signal at +6dB. Lastly, there's a track to show residual noise, consisting of unmodulated grooves. This one will prove to be a real party trick if you use an idler-drive deck and none of your friends are willing to believe it's a quiet runner...

The turntable choice is easy here - almost all users need DJ turntables and I’ll show the best. The Technics SL-1210M5G has a better audible sound (i don’t know why :S ) maybe b/c it has better audio leads inside the box + more accurate quartz lock than regular ones.

Find a good RIAA pre which is good for u. I prefer the UREI-1122 or Danish Audio Connect CT100 with CT102 Power supply.

Now we need to find a good AD/DA converter i use Universal Audio 2192 for this process. it’s the ultimate AD/DA but really expensive gear. Totally solid-state device no IC, no trick :D

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http://www.uaudio.com/products/digital/2192/index.html

When I capture the sample rate I set it to 24bit 176.4kHz b/c this has a 4 times higher sample rate than CD easily convertable to 44.1 (no need for an antialias-filter in conversion which cuts down the sonic quality.)


Cartridge installation

Cartridge installation begins by affixing the cartridge body to the tonearm headshell. Tonearm headshells typically contain either slots or holes through which screws (usually supplied with the cartridge, and should be of the non-magnetic variety) may be passed into the cartridge body. Slotted headshells allow for the position of the cartridge to be adjusted for correct alignment. The holes in a cartridge body, meant to accept the screws which affix the cartridge to the headshell, generally come in two flavors: threaded (or tapped), and non-threaded. Threaded holes are more convenient to use, as they they obviate the need for the small, difficult-to-handle nuts required to secure the cartridge screws to a non-threaded cartridge body. If your cartridge does not have a threaded body, then you'll have to resort to using nuts to secure the cartridge screws. If possible, insert the screws from the bottom of the cartridge, through the slots or holes in the headshell, so that the nuts can be secured from above. Those lucky enough to have a tapped cartridge can simply insert the screws down through the headshell into the tapped holes in the cartridge body (it is a good idea to use a washer between each screw head and the headshell so that the tightened screw will not mar the headshell's finish). In either case, the cartridge screws should be tightened slightly so that the cartridge is somewhat secure but still allowed to move with moderate hand pressure. In the case of a fixed-hole headshell, the cartridge screws can be fully tightened as no further adjustment is possible. Keep in mind that cartridge screws should be quite snug but not over-tightened. Overtightening can distort the cartridge body or, in the worst case, cause it to crack.

Once the cartridge is affixed to the headshell, connect the fine color-coded tonearm wires to the corresponding color-coded pins on the back of the cartridge body. While connecting the tonearm wires to the cartridge pins, always handle the wires with great care - they are fragile and can be damaged by surprisingly little force. Grab the small metal cartridge clips which terminate the tonearm wires using a pair of tweezers (never grab the tonearm wires themselves!), and guide the clips onto the cartridge pins. In some cases, the clips may be difficult to fit over the cartridge pins unless they are pried open slightly using a small screwdriver or a toothpick. Don't overdo it or the clips won't make good contact with the pins. In the event that the clips are spread too wide, they can be squeezed back together using a small pair of needlenose pliers..

To play back a vinyl disc, the stylus must make good contact with the walls of the record groove. The question is, how much downward force should be applied so that the stylus will neither lose contact with the groove wall as it traces the path of the groove, nor fail to faithfully follow the path of the groove due to excessive downforce? Cartridge manufacturer's typically specify the downforce, or tracking weight, for a particular cartridge, usually as a range of recommended values in grams. It is best to begin the process of determining the optimal tracking weight within the specified range by setting it to the highest value within that range. To dispel a common myth, a cartridge given insufficient tracking weight is more likely to cause damage to the groove wall than one whose tracking weight is set at the high end of the recommended range. This is because a cartridge that is tracking too lightly will tend to lose contact with the groove wall, or mistrack, on highly modulated passages, causing damage to the groove as it bounces about in an attempt to regain contact. The Shure gauge works essentially like a balance: the stylus is placed in a recessed groove at one end of the balance, and a sliding counterweight, towards the opposite end of the balance, is moved along a calibrated scale in an effort to counteract the weight of the cartridge. When perfect balance is achieved, the weight of the stylus against the balance can be read directly from the calibrated scale. Although the results achieved with the Shure gauge are approximate at best (results are dependent on the accuracy of the calibrated scale, as well as the user's ability to visually judge the degree of balance achieved), they are more than good enough in most cases. Shure states that the SFG-2 is accurate to 1/10 of a gram for tracking weights less than 1.5 grams. For cartridge's that track at heavier weights, it is, in my experience, more realistic to expect measurements taken with the SFG-2 to be accurate to within 2/10 of a gram. Still, given the fact that tracking weight can vary by as much as a few tenths of a gram as a cartridge tracks record warps, the Shure gauge should prove sufficiently accurate for most installations.

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Before attempting to set the cartridge's tracking weight using a gauge and/or a test record, it is best to zero-balance, or "float", the arm with the cartridge affixed. This provides a good reference point from which to begin to increase the tracking weight towards the desired value. The arm/cartridge is floated by moving the arm's counterweight either towards or away from the headshell until the arm reaches a point at which it floats with virtual weightlessness. At this point, the tracking weight of the cartridge is approximately 0 grams and can be set accurately using a gauge like one of those described above. With the stylus pressure set to the high end of the manufacturer's specified range, it's a good time to adjust the height of the tonearm so that the arm tube is roughly parallel to the platter. You'll fine tune the height of the arm later in the setup process, but getting it set parallel now will make later adjustments that much easier. Most arms allow for some form of height adjustment. However, small spacers can be placed under the arm to raise it to the desired height.

- Under the technics tower u can twist the arm-height adjustment ring and it will change the tower height level. Before u do, this needs to slew out the security metal arm-locker in the right side of the tower looks like a metal "tear".

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Don't fuss too much over the height of the arm at this point. You'll have plenty of time to obsess over it with typical anal(og) retentiveness later in the process. Records are cut using a cutter head that is positioned at a tangent, or parallel, to the cut groove. With a pivoted tonearm, which forces the stylus to trace an arc across the record surface, only an approximation to the cutter head's tangential path is possible. The seminal work of Baerwald ca. 1941 showed that the tracking error of a pivoted stylus could be minimized if the stylus is aligned such that it is parallel to the groove at two points along its curved path: specifically, at the two points that are a distance of 66 and 120.9 mm (or 2.6 and 4.76 inches) from the center of the spindle (note that these numbers assume that the inner and outer radii of the record's grooves are no smaller than 2.375" and no larger than 5.75" respectively, which is, thankfully, the case for most records). These two points are commonly referred to as "null points" as a tracking error of zero is achieved when the stylus is tangent to the groove at these points. A commercially available cartridge alignment gauge can be used to align the cartridge such that it satisfies the tangency requirements at the null points.Most modern cartridge alignment gauges, such as the popular D B Systems DBP-10, are designed to produce correct Baerwald two-point alignment, although there are some that are designed using a less common one-point method (the alignment jig that is included with the VPI JMW tonearm, for example). When aligning a cartridge for tangency using any alignment protractor, it is essential to remember that you are attempting to align the cantilever (and, hence, the stylus), not the cartridge body. There is no guarantee that the cantilever is perfectly aligned within the cartridge body, so simply aligning the cartridge body will not necessarily produce the desired result. Furthermore, many cartridge bodies have non-parallel sides, making tangential alignment of the cartridge body with the lines of tangency on the gauge virtually impossible.

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Most alignment gauges are simply cardboard, plastic (or, in some cases, glass) templates onto which are printed or scribed the null point(s) and lines of tangency against which the cartridge should be aligned. The template is placed over the turntable's spindle (made possible via a spindle-sized hole drilled in the template) and placed against the platter. The cartridge's position in the headshell is then manipulated until the stylus is parallel to the gauge's lines of tangency at the null point(s). This process is made somewhat easier by the use of a small, lighted magnifying glass which will allow you to better view the near-microscopic stylus and scrawny cantilever, both usually obscured by the shadow of the cartridge body. This is, by far, the most frustrating and time-consuming part of the cartridge installation process. Making small adjustments to align the stylus with the null point(s) invariably alters its relationship to the lines of tangency - or vice versa. Keep the screws holding the cartridge to the headshell as tight as possible, but just loose enough to allow slight changes in cartridge position. With any luck, the force of the screws against the headshell will hold the cartridge in position while you check your changes against the template (if you're unlucky, the force of the tonearm wires against the back of the cartridge will negate all of your hard work up to that point!). When everything is lined up, tighten the headshell screws with one hand while holding the cartridge steady with the other. Hold the cartridge firmly in place, as the torsional force generated while snugging down the screws will tend to twist the cartridge in the headshell, thus spoiling the cartridge's tangency. While it might, at some point into this process, seem that aligning what has now become known as "that freaking cartridge" with "those freaking lines and points" of "that freaking gauge" is virtually impossible, take solace in the fact that you're only a dozen or so hours away from playing a freaking record.

With the cartridge aligned (and the sweat squeegeed from your turntable's platter), it's time to set the cantilever's azimuth, or perpendicularity to the groove. Without a correct azimuth setting, the electrical output from the cartridge's two generators will be unequal (when reproducing a signal with equal amplitude in both channels), resulting in a channel imbalance and a shift of the soundstage to either the left or right.Azimuth can be roughed-in visually by inspecting the front of the cartridge while the stylus is in the record groove. Does one side of the cartridge appear to be closer to the record surface than the other? If so, then use whatever means the tonearm manufacturer provided to adjust the azimuth such that the cartridge body is parallel (within the limits of your vision) to the record surface. Once a rough azimuth adjustment is found visually, it can be fine tuned via measurement. The optimal azimuth setting is the one that produces electrical signals of equal amplitude from the cartridge's generators when signals of equal amplitude are present in both channels of the record. Therefore, if we play a record with the same signal in both channels (a monophonic record, for example), but wire one channel out of phase, then the correct azimuth adjustment is the one that produces zero (or near zero) output when the two out-of-phase channels are summed (remember that summing two signals, one out of phase with respect to the other, results in no signal due to destructive interference.) This out-of-phase, or "null", test, can be performed in several ways. If you've got a test record such as the one produced by Hi Fi News and Record Review (and I recommend it highly), then you can simply make use of the azimuth test track it provides. This test track consists of a mono signal with the left and right channels out of phase. If your preamplifier has a mono blend switch (which sums the left and right channels), you can simply play the test track, engage the mono switch, and adjust the cartridge's azimuth until you hear minimal output through the loudspeakers. In the absence of a test record with an out-of--phase mono track, you can simulate such a track by playing a mono record through a DIY phase-inverting cable. To build such a cable, buy yourself a cheap female-to-male patch cord from your local Radio Shack, cut one leg of the cable in half, and strip away some of the insulation around the copper conductors. Then, solder the positive conductor from one half of the cut leg of the cable to the negative conductor from the other half of the cut leg. Finally, solder the negative conductor from the first half of the cable to the positive conductor from the second half. Cover the exposed conductors/solder joints with electrical tape. You now have a cable that inverts phase in one channel. Now, connect the male end of your tonearm cable to the female end of the inverting cable you've just created, and connect the other end of the inverting cable to the inputs of your phono stage or the phono inputs of your preamplifier. Play a mono record (I use the DCC reissue of Sonny Rollins' Tenor Madness) and switch your preamplifier into mono mode. The azimuth of your cartridge can now be adjusted until you hear zero (or, at least, minimal) output from your loudspeakers. If your preamplifier doesn't provide a mono blend switch (this feature is becoming rapidly extinct, and I applaud Audible Illusions for continuing to provide one on its Modulus 3A product), then you can dial-in the azimuth of your cartridge using either an oscilloscope (if you have access to one), cartridge analyzer (if you can find one), or the rough 'n ready visual test described above.

With the tracking force roughed in, alignment spot on, and azimuth nailed down, a test record, such as the terrific one produced by Hi Fi News and Record Review, can be used to really optimize the setup. In particular, the cartridge's ability to track difficult passages can be fine-tuned using several bands on the test disc. The tracking tests consist of a test tone (300 Hz in both channels at +15dB) spaced evenly across the surface of the record in order to gauge the consistency of the arm/cartridge's tracking ability. With the cartridge's tracking weight set to the manufacturer's specified maximum value, the tones produced should be pure, without any audible signs of buzzing or distortion. Be aware that buzzing in one channel only is likely the result of an incorrect anti-skating setting (discussed below), rather than a problem with the cartridge's tracking weight. If the signal is stable in one channel but unstable in another, don't increase the tracking weight in an attempt to compensate. You'll likely be able to eliminate the buzzing in the one channel when you set the anti-skate shortly. The tracking weight can now be decreased gradually until it reaches the minimum value for which the tracking tests continue to produce good results. The resultant tracking weight should represent a good balance between tracking ability and record wear. Of course, modifying the tracking weight changes the deflection of the cantilever with respect to the cartridge body. In other words, the Herculean effort you expended to get the stylus to fall squarely on the magic null point(s) of the alignment gauge has just been undone by a simple change in tracking weight (you'll soon come to realize that almost every cartridge setup parameter is affected by every other). Fix the cartridge alignment, and recheck the tracking weight and azimuth while you're at it. If that old CD player in the corner is starting to look awfully good about now, don't despair, you're getting there!

The last critical setup parameter that can be optimized using a test record, such as the one from Hi Fi News and Record Review, is anti-skate. The so-called skating force is a vector force which tends to draw the tonearm/cartridge towards the center of the record when the cartridge is mounted in an offset headshell i.e. a headshell that is at an angle to the line of the arm tube (most modern tonearms utilize offset headshells in an effort to minimize tracking distortion). Unless countered, this force can produce uneven, and premature, wear of the walls of the record groove and stylus, and compromises the ideal spatial relationship between the cartridge's coils and magnet structure. Unfortunately, the skating force varies continuously across the surface of the record and is, therefore, difficult to combat fully. Most tonearms contain a spring-like device that applies a force in the opposite direction of the skating force with approximately equal magnitude.Thus far, the cartridge has been aligned in such a way as to minimize the tracking error across the surface of the record, and the cartridge's azimuth has been set such that the stylus is perpendicular to the surface of the record.

The last adjustment we can make in an effort to duplicate the cutter's path through the vinyl disc is to set the angle of the cantilever relative to the record surface to closely approximate that of the original cutter head. This angle, referred to as the vertical tracking angle or VTA, is changed by modifying the height of the tonearm relative to its base. As the arm height is increased, the VTA is increased, and as the arm height is decreased, the VTA is decreased. Most records are cut with a VTA of approximately 22 degrees, although it is not uncommon for a record to be cut with a VTA as low as 18 or as high as 24 degrees. Setting a cartridge's VTA is best begun by setting the arm tube parallel to the record surface (if you followed my previous advice, you will already have done this prior to aligning the cartridge). If the cartridge manufacturer was clever enough to have angled the cantilever at approximately 22 degrees to the horizontal, then setting the arm tube parallel to the record surface should set the VTA to approximately 22 degrees - just fine for playing back the majority of discs. Unfortunately, cantilevers are not always angled at exactly 22 degrees, so setting the arm tube parallel to the record surface may not result in the correct setting. Since there is no convenient way to measure a cartridge's VTA, the best one can do is experiment with different settings and settle on the one that sounds best to the ear. If you're happy with the sound you're getting with the arm tube parallel to the record surface, then leave it there and spend the rest of your time enjoying your record collection. If you want to experiment with various VTA settings, keep in mind that setting the VTA too high will cause the high frequencies to be accentuated, resulting in a bright, fatiguing presentation. In contrast, setting the VTA too low will cause the low frequencies to be accentuated, resulting in a boomy, sluggish presentation. One could spend a good portion of their remaining days on earth tweaking their cartridge's VTA. It will, after all, vary depending on the thickness of each record played. While it's worth investing a reasonable amount of time to find a VTA setting that works well for a representative sample of records in your collection, don't obsess over it. Life's too short, and there's too much music to be heard.

Congratulations! You're not done yet! Go back and verify that the tracking force, alignment, and azimuth settings haven't been fouled while making other adjustments. Pay particular attention to azimuth, as adjusting the arm height will likely have subtly modified this setting (although it is difficult to visualize in three dimensions, raising the height of a tonearm with an offset headshell will affect the stylus' perpendicularity to the groove).

Continue to listen to your setup and make minor adjustments until you're satisfied with the results. Then put away the alignment and stylus pressure gauges, file away the test records, and kick back with a fist full of your favorite records. I think you'll find that it really was worth all the effort.

I hope this will help anyone with getting correct settings, now u need to setup the turntable spirit level with the leveler. Its easy b/c the technics and usually almost all turntables have twistable legs which solve the height problems. I don’t prefer isolators b/c when i digitalize i totally shoot out the sound in the room so I dont need the isolator.

For correct signal leveling you need a preamp before the signal will reach the AD/DA or soundcard b/c you need to use all possible bits in the process (this makes less quantized distortion). Now i use 2* Focusrite ISA430mkII or AMEK mixers for this process. If u want to do it little better use a compressor after the preamp - it can help eliminate the unnecessary peaks from the analog domain. I don’t love the limiter in this process but anyone can find the best way to pickup with a little skill in this process.

I will follow soon...
Last edited by fgp303 on Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:41 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby juno on Tue Mar 22, 2005 4:04 am

yes very good

anyone wanting to learn how to capture the best sound when using your turntable I would suggest reading through this tutorial

this is man who knows what he's talkin about - fo sho! 8)
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Postby fgp303 on Tue Mar 22, 2005 5:04 am

Thank u Juno and dj_caned for the help in this tutorial!
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Postby acapella on Tue Mar 22, 2005 2:46 pm

A big thankyou to fgp303 for this extremely concise write-up on how to best capture the sound from your turntable..

totally defintive guide I would say and well this will defintely be a contender for a forthcoming tutorials section whenever that will be is anyone's guess.

Much appreciated once again fgp303.

acapella.

p.s you might want to add a personalised footer to all of your posts like this in the future because I have absolutely no doubt the content will br copied and pasted to many other sucklike forums.. We'd just like to see the original owners/writers take the credit. Credit where credit's due etc.

something like..

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Postby AxCapone on Tue Mar 22, 2005 3:23 pm

:cry: :cry: :cry:
sigh... i dont got turntables anymore...what a sad thing...
awesome tutorial ... keep up the good work dude
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Postby fgp303 on Tue Mar 22, 2005 4:47 pm

Thanks for reading! I thought about the footer but its simple not fit to my style thats why i didnt use it.

If anyones needs a test song at 24bit88.2khz i've made 2 with these gears, simply drop a pm if you want a listen or for a system test.
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Postby dj_caned on Thu Mar 24, 2005 11:52 pm

Shplarz wrote:interesting but seems like a massive shellout for some shells and other eqp't


Yeah carts and needles are the only physical thing to touch the vinyl apart from your hands though, and poor quality ones could wreck that absolute classic of a tune you are so proud to have in your collection ;) In my eyes its always worth spending a bit on the needles/carts and ensuring your tonearm etc is set right, as well as giving you a far superior output quality your gonna get more play out of those 12's ;)
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Postby In Silico on Sat Apr 16, 2005 5:02 pm

Wow man, that's awesome! Thanks for the super-informative info on headshell leads and the like. I've worked at a record store for 3+ years and some of that stuff was still way beyond anything I've ever undertaken. Personally, I use Shure Needlz, but Ortofons are OK as long as you don't use the banana-style carts. Thanks!
-R
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Postby fgp303 on Sat Apr 16, 2005 6:36 pm

In Silico wrote: Personally, I use Shure Needlz, but Ortofons are OK as long as you don't use the banana-style carts. Thanks!
-R


Haha fgp never will use banana style catridge cos all from this have crap sound :S. Personaly i dont like the shure needles cos in full discreet system they have crisp High freq for same price ortofon better solution except if u loking for scratch needles where Shure are good.
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Postby In Silico on Sat Apr 16, 2005 9:44 pm

Yeh, I don't use their DJ needlz so much as their Hi-Fi archiving needlz. I use the M-447's to play out at clubs, but that's about it.
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Postby Crin on Mon Apr 18, 2005 10:42 am

fgp303 wrote:Haha fgp never will use banana style catridge cos all from this have crap sound :S.


You think so? have Ortophon DJ in the "banana style carts" and my sound is pretty good. Though to be fair I've never really been that fussed about crystal sound.
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Postby fgp303 on Mon Apr 18, 2005 10:52 am

Crin wrote:You think so? have Ortophon DJ in the "banana style carts" and my sound is pretty good. Though to be fair I've never really been that fussed about crystal sound.


I think u never hear a good turntable system this is the fact why u write this. :shock: Generally the banana style have big trouble with distortion and not to lineral. Ortofon only made this for lo-fi segments. (once see ortofon broshures where the u can find same concord vs om pickup side by side test u will will see it).
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Postby The Cutter on Thu Jun 23, 2005 2:20 pm

Thanks for the post it is very informative. There was much that I did not know about calibrating my needle. I will keep this post in my things to know file. Thanks again.

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Postby The Cutter on Thu Jun 23, 2005 2:26 pm

By the way what is the best catridge for archiving your records. I buy a lot of used vinyl( from thrift stores etc) and I want to get the highest quality sound when transfering to my puter. My deck has a digital output and I use my Motu to record digital but I am always looking to get the best sonic quality in my transfers. Any suggestions would be great.

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Postby fgp303 on Sat Jul 09, 2005 8:18 am

thecutter wrote:My deck has a digital output
Have u stanton turntable ? what ever who made it teh built in AD converter are really crap i think u can reach better quality if u change the deck and use full analog and after digitalize with ur motu soundcard (which motu have u ?).

what is the best catridge for archiving your records?

Not easy question this cannot answerable cos always depending ur gears and type of music what u want capture. I think Ortofon OM40 are good general choose cos this is the top MM system from ortofon.
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Postby tim.gosden on Thu Sep 01, 2005 9:59 am

Thas not oldschool, its just pointless. If you want that sound, just play the record with a crappy deck.
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Postby DJJEF on Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:29 am

wow!!!nice job i can see some one did not skip class.that was a kick a** tutoral thanks for the info. i love my 1200s :cheesy:
WUZ UP ALL!!! D.J. JEF FRM CHI-TOWN
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Postby lamme929 on Sat Jan 13, 2007 7:04 pm

exelent tutorial :smt038 I just use my turntables with a simple lead to my pc and record with audacity simpler but with inferior quality of course but for me it´s fine :P
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Postby kelsashomework on Sun Feb 04, 2007 7:02 pm

thx it helped me a lot
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Postby BLENDCHAMP on Mon Feb 05, 2007 9:27 pm

thankx
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Postby korkhammaregon on Fri Mar 30, 2007 5:09 pm

coooll
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Postby RyanK95 on Thu May 10, 2007 5:39 am

An excellent tutorial for capturing audio, however, I believe a thorough tutorial on using software to edit/enhance/restore audio is also an imortant part of modern archiving...
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Postby DJXL17 on Sun May 27, 2007 5:29 pm

This is pretty dope.
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Postby vangothahustla on Mon Jun 18, 2007 7:17 am

dope tutorial.
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Postby titer on Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:38 am

Do you need a usb for the tables or not?
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Postby hamburger on Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:58 am

nice work. thanks
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Postby cakw on Fri Apr 18, 2008 4:24 am

that was incredibly thorough! O_O
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Postby p.illa on Wed Dec 24, 2008 9:27 pm

Good looks on the post!
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Postby Milo123 on Mon May 25, 2009 12:26 am

I always thought vinyl rips produced a crackling sound at the start, but i guess it just depends on the equipment you have!
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